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Category Filtering: 'source-control'

29
January 2014

Gavin Pickin

State of the Union - Source Control - Mr Adam Cameron is at it again

CFML Language, Chit Chat, Source Control

One of my fellow countrymen (Exported Kiwis), Adam "Vinegar and Beer" Cameron, has posted some interesting material on his blog. Well, there is no surprise there, his stuff is always interesting actually, but I should be more accurate and say, he has posted some "explosive" material on his blog.

18
January 2014

Gavin Pickin

Git for Dummies - Rolling back a Commit - Power of Git

Source Control

One of the reasons we should really use source control was made very evident today, so I decided to share my story, albeit, at my own expense, you'll find out why, soon. So I got a text message today, asking if I could restore a folder on one of our servers. Some how, the folder got zapped, not sure by who, not sure how, but we need to restore it, so it can be business as usual. Should we restore from backup? We could, but we have Git setup for this project, so we can check the commits, and restore the folder from the last good commit, simple enough... so lets go through it.

Now, first, I wanted to know when did this folder suddenly disappear. You can use command line for all of this stuff, and we have been so far in this dummies series, but sometimes, there is a time and a place for GUI, and using BitBucket (this is where we host our private git repos) and BitBucket's website is a perfect example for this, instead of looking through command line readout.

12
December 2013

Gavin Pickin

Git for Dummies - Merge Conflicts - Resolving Diff Files

Source Control

Welcome back to another post in our Git for Dummies series. We have covered a lot of things, too many to keep posting in the introduction, so click on the Source Control Category on the right hand side to see all of the posts... from Installing, Setting up SSH keys, BitBucket, Remote Repos... but today, we're going to talk about what happens when it doesn't all go to plan. 

One of the great benefits of Git, is that is it distributed, and you can have repos here, there and everywhere. You have several developers working on your project, and they are all working on different files, mostly, sometimes, you might edit the same file. Oh no, are we going to lose someones changes? No, not at all, and most of the time, Git is smart enough to recursively merge the files automatically for you. Of course, you knew there was a but coming... sometimes, if you change the file in such a way Git cannot tell what change should be used... for example, you both edit the same line / chunk of code... then Git says, I'm not messing with this, you fix it, and creates a Diff File (as I like to call it). 

What do we do now?

05
December 2013

Gavin Pickin

Git for Dummies - More about GitIgnore and Cleaner Alternatives

Source Control

After yesterdays post on 'Git for Dummies - Using GITIGNORE files to exclude certain files and folders', we got some great feedback from Jim and Peter, which you can read here. Today, we'll talk about their feedback, and explore a little more into GitIgnore and Cleaner Alternatives to the .gitignore file.

If you're new to the series, don't feel like you missed out, you can still go back and read some of the previous posts, where we covered the basics, and we're now getting into more nitty gritty. 

Why you should use Source Control, Not Using Source Control, amazingly you're not aloneInstalling Git on WindowsInstalling Git on Mac OSXInstalling Git on LinuxYour First RepoSetting up your first Remote Repo on BitbucketCreating your SSH Keys for BitbucketHow to set your Default Name and Email in Git, Converting a Project into a Git RepoPushing Code from Dev to Production with Git, and yesterday... Using GitIgnore to exclude and certain files and folders.

To save you some time jumping back to the last post here, I'll just post Jim and Peter's comments here, and we can build on that.

04
December 2013

Gavin Pickin

Git for Dummies - Using GITIGNORE files to exclude certain files and folders

Source Control

After a little break, I am back with my Git for Dummies series. We've covered a lot so far, and we're starting to use Git now, and as we continue in this series, we'll start to see a few more day to day tasks, and we'll introduce some of the bigger concepts as we face a few hurdles. Thankfully, Git makes these hurdles into more of a speed bump, one of them that I was happy to get working, was GitIgnore, to exclude files and folders that I don't care about, or don't want polluting my repos.

So far we have covered Why you should use Source Control, Not Using Source Control, amazingly you're not aloneInstalling Git on WindowsInstalling Git on Mac OSXInstalling Git on LinuxYour First RepoSetting up your first Remote Repo on BitbucketCreating your SSH Keys for BitbucketHow to set your Default Name and Email in Git, Converting a Project into a Git RepoPushing Code from Dev to Production with Git, and today... using GitIgnore to exclude and certain files and folders.

24
November 2013

Gavin Pickin

Git for Dummies - Pushing Code from Dev to Production with Git

Source Control

Thank you for reading along with my Git for Dummies series. We've covered a lot so far, and we're starting to use Git now, and as we continue in this series, we'll start to see a few more day to day tasks, and we'll introduce some of the bigger concepts as we face a few hurdles. Thankfully, Git makes these hurdles into more of a speed bump, and you'll see a good example today.

So far we have covered Why you should use Source Control, Not Using Source Control, amazingly you're not aloneInstalling Git on WindowsInstalling Git on Mac OSXInstalling Git on LinuxYour First RepoSetting up your first Remote Repo on BitbucketCreating your SSH Keys for BitbucketHow to set your Default Name and Email in Git, Converting a Project into a Git Repo, today, Pushing Code from Dev to Production with Git.

18
November 2013

Gavin Pickin

Git for Dummies - Converting a Project into a Git Repo

Source Control

Thank you for reading along with my Git for Dummies series. It can be a daunting task, and this series tries to show you step by step all the little processes you will come across as you start using Git. The best part about it, I'm not a Git expert, I'm fairly new to it, and as I help people I know get better, I'm sharing the knowledge with you. 

So far we have covered Why you should use Source Control, Not Using Source Control, amazingly you're not aloneInstalling Git on WindowsInstalling Git on Mac OSXInstalling Git on LinuxYour First RepoSetting up your first Remote Repo on BitbucketCreating your SSH Keys for Bitbucket, and today, Converting a Project into a Git Repo.

Being a developer, you have loads of projects sitting around, small ones, big ones, but we've only showed you how to start a repo from scratch, well, that doesn't help you with all the existing projects, so we'll walk through how to make an existing project into a repo, and how to store it on Bitbucket.

18
November 2013

Gavin Pickin

Git for Dummies - How to set your Name and Email Address in Git

Source Control

We have walked through a lot of different tasks in this Git for Dummies series so far, but there is something I forgot to mention when I wrote the first few. I will go back and update Installing Git on WindowsInstalling Git on Mac OSXInstalling Git on Linux,  and Your First Repo, but I wanted to add a separate entry, for those who have already read those, and might not go back and see the update.

Depending on how your machine is setup, Git can sometimes guess what your Name, and Email Address are, and will use those when storing your commit, so you have more meaningful tracking information. My machines are either setup for auto-detection, or I had set that global setting in git, so I completely missed that step in the walk throughs, until someone reminded me, so here I am, coming back to fill in the gap.

09
November 2013

Gavin Pickin

Git for Dummies - Creating your SSH Keys for Bit Bucket

Source Control

Many Git Servers communicate using SSH, and to authenticate, you should use SSH Keys. You can setup multiple keys, but that goes beyond a Dummies setup… so we'll setup a general Public / Private SSH Key Pair.  If you don't have a Bit Bucket account, make sure you go through this post. If you need to install Git on Windows, Mac OSX and Linux, visit some of my older posts.

09
November 2013

Gavin Pickin

Git for Dummies - Setting Up your Remote Repo on Bit Bucket

Source Control

Git is a distributed system, so you have "local" repos on you and your developers machines, and then (usually) a remote repo.
In our last walkthrough, we started by creating the "local" repo on your machine... now we need to setup the remote repo, in this example, we're going to use Bit Bucket, because you can have unlimited free private repos for individuals, and small teams, and very affordable prices for bigger teams. 

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